Book a Genoa Ferry

Genoa ferries connect Italy with Corsica, Sardinia, Tunisia, Spain, Sicily & Morocco with crossings available to Bastia (in Corsica), Olbia, Porto Torres & Arbatax (in Sardinia), Tunis (in Tunisia), Barcelona (in Spain), Palermo (in Sicily) & Tangier Med (in Morocco). Genoa Ferry crossings are operated by Moby Lines, Grandi Navi Veloci, Tirrenia & CTN Ferries and depending on time of year you’ll find a choice of up to 12 ferry crossings daily.

There are up to 12 ferry crossings daily from Genoa with sailing durations starting from 10 hours. Our Genoa ferry summary provides a good guide but for the latest sailing information use our fare search.

Genoa

Genoa Ferry Alternatives

Genoa Ferry Services

  • Moby Lines
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 10 hr
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  • Moby Lines
    • 11 Sailings Weekly 10 hr 30 min
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  • Tirrenia
    • 5 Sailings Weekly 10 hr
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  • Grandi Navi Veloci
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 24 hr
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  • CTN Ferries
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 22 hr
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  • Grandi Navi Veloci
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 19 hr 30 min
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  • Grandi Navi Veloci
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 21 hr
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  • Grandi Navi Veloci
    • 4 Sailings Weekly 13 hr 30 min
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  • Tirrenia
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 11 hr 30 min
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  • Grandi Navi Veloci
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 48 hr 30 min
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  • Tirrenia
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 15 hr 30 min
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Genoa Guide

Genoa is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria. Genoa's history goes back to ancient times. A city cemetery, dating from the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., testifies to the occupation of the site by the Greeks, but the fine harbor probably was in use much earlier, perhaps by the Etruscans. Destroyed by the Carthaginians in 209 BC, the town was rebuilt by Rome, under which the city enjoyed municipal rights and exported skins, wood, and honey.
In 1797, under pressure from Napoleon, Genoa became a French protectorate called the Ligurian Republic, which was annexed by France in 1805. Although the Genoese revolted against France in 1814 and liberated the city on their own, delegates at the Congress of Vienna sanctioned its incorporation into Piedmont (Kingdom of Sardinia), thus ending the three century old struggle by the House of Savoy to acquire the city.