Book a Livorno Ferry

Livorno ferries connect Italy with Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily, Spain, Morocco & Capraia Island with crossings available to Bastia & Ile Rousse (in Corsica), Golfo Aranci & Olbia (in Sardinia), Palermo (in Sicily), Barcelona (in Spain), Tangier Med (in Morocco) & Capraia (in Capraia Island). Livorno Ferry crossings are operated by Corsica Sardinia Ferries, Moby Lines, Grimaldi Lines & Toremar and depending on time of year you’ll find a choice of up to 12 ferry crossings daily.

There are up to 12 ferry crossings daily from Livorno with sailing durations starting from 2 hours 45 minutes. Our Livorno ferry summary provides a good guide but for the latest sailing information use our fare search.

Livorno

Livorno Ferry Alternatives

Livorno Ferry Services

  • Corsica Sardinia Ferries
    • 14 Sailings Weekly 4 hr 5 min
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  • Moby Lines
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 4 hr 5 min
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  • Corsica Sardinia Ferries
    • 14 Sailings Weekly 6 hr 25 min
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  • Corsica Sardinia Ferries
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 9 hr
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  • Moby Lines
    • 14 Sailings Weekly 6 hr 30 min
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  • Grimaldi Lines
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 18 hr
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  • Grimaldi Lines
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 20 hr 30 min
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  • Grimaldi Lines
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 60 hr
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  • Toremar
    • 9 Sailings Weekly 2 hr 45 min
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Livorno Guide

Livorno is a port city on the Tyrrhenian Sea on the western edge of Tuscany, Italy. It is the capital of the Province of Livorno and the third-largest port on the western coast of Italy.
Livorno's port was developed under the Medici. In 1618, they declared it a free port and instituted a liberal constitution which prompted an influx of Jews, Greeks, Spanish Muslims, English Catholics and a cosmopolitan throng of other refugees. Livorno flourished, and attracted a community of English expatriates (including Shelley) whose anglicization of the city's name into Leghorn is still in use today.
Europe’s first bathing establishments were built here in the nineteenth century when the idea of seaside holidays first became popular.
Ancient seagoing traditions are also kept alive by rowing races held between the city’s various quarters, both in the sea and on the canals.